Sri Lanka Hotel bookings / Tour packages

Mannar

Mannar Island, about 130 sq km in area, juts out into the Palk Straits towards   India like a claw, creating a Gulf that is named after it. The island is   connected to the mainland by a bridge and causeway some 3 km in length. The main   feature of the town of Mannar is its Portuguese fort, which was erected in 1560.   It has a four-sided design, with four bastions, a wet ditch on three sides, and   an arm of the sea washing the fourth. The battlements are prominent and   picturesque while travelling along the causeway from the mainland. The Dutch   took it after a naval bombardment, strengthened it, but do not appear to have   significantly altered it.

Mannar Island, about 130 sq km in area, juts out into the Palk Straits towards   India like a claw, creating a Gulf that is named after it. The island is   connected to the mainland by a bridge and causeway some 3 km in length. The main   feature of the town of Mannar is its Portuguese fort, which was erected in 1560.   It has a four-sided design, with four bastions, a wet ditch on three sides, and   an arm of the sea washing the fourth. The battlements are prominent and   picturesque while travelling along the causeway from the mainland. The Dutch   took it after a naval bombardment, strengthened it, but do not appear to have   significantly altered it.

The Mannar district features some exotic fauna and flora. The dugong, a marine   mammal and distant relative of the elephant, lives in the shallow waters off the   coast feeding on sea grasses. Dugongs probably gave rise to the mermaid legend,   due to their vaguely human appearance while bobbing in the water with just their   heads exposed, and tendency to suckle their young on the surface, holding them   with their flippers in the manner of a woman with her baby. Sightings by   European sailors of dugongs in the Gulf of Mannar in the 16th and 17th centuries   no doubt strengthened the already widespread mermaid legend in the West.